Kindfulmind teaches and promotes mindfulness.

Benefits of mindfulness include:

  • Increased concentration
  • Build emotional resilience
  • Improved mental health
  • Improved physical health
  • Improve sleep quality
  • Inner sense of well-being
  • Reduce anxiety

'Mindfulness means paying attention in a particular way: on purpose, in the present moment, and non-judgementally'

- Jon Kabat-Zinn

Mindfulness is a skill that can be learned and improved over time to improve concentration, emotional reactions, and general well-being. Mindfulness means maintaining a moment-by-moment awareness of our thoughts, feelings, bodily sensations and emotions, without judging or labeling them. We start to become an 'observer' of our minds through practice, rather than getting caught up in thoughts, or believing all of the thoughts we are having.

Children today are faced with an unprecedented amount of stress and anxiety

Around 25% of 13-18 year olds will experience an anxiety disorder according to mental health studies. Such early stress levels can negatively impact on learning, memory, behaviour, and physical as well as mental health. This is where mindfulness training can help.

By training to focus their awareness (attention), children and young people are able to improve their attention, memory, emotional regulation, optimism, stress levels and empathy. Through regular practice, they gain the tools and insight to help themselves at difficult times, giving them a strong foundation to learn and achieve their best.

Incorporating mindfulness into education has been linked to improving academic and social and emotional learning. Also, mindfulness strengthens some underlying development processes, such as focus, resilience, and self-soothing that will help them in the long run.

Mindfulness is not just about maintaining attention in the present moment. There are other qualities that we bring to the practice; including gratitude and also cultivating kindness and compassion for ourselves and others

Mindfulness means maintaining a moment-by-moment awareness of our thoughts, feelings, bodily sensations and emotions, without judging or labeling them. We start to become an 'observer' of our minds through practice, rather than getting caught up in thoughts, or believing all of the thoughts we are having. 

By observing and not judging or believing, we begin to create some space between our thoughts and reactions; we can choose how we want to act in situations instead of an unconscious thought or reaction. By becoming aware of our body sensations and emotions, we can also learn to 'tune in' to ourselves and can start to become aware of triggers in the body which can lead to particular emotions. We can learn to be with emotions, even if they are difficult, without judging or reacting in a particular way, and this in-turn can build emotional resilience.

Body

The video offers a basic understanding of mindfulness but it also aims to evoke your memory of experiencing what it feels like to be mindful. Most of us have already experienced being mindful before. We've entered it spontaneously, maybe many times in our lives, but with a bit of training it's possible to be mindul at any time we choose- even to make it a way of living our lives. That is a truly wonderful way to live!

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